12 Books Every Christian Should Read. Book 2

C.S. Lewis:  Mere Christianity  Mere Christianity - by  C S Lewis (Paperback) - image 1 of 1

One of the most powerful Christian influences over the course of my life has been the writings of C.S. Lewis.  Lewis, a confirmed atheist until the age of 31 when he was converted to Christianity, has become for many the bastion of Christian apologetics, the defense of the faith.  With his British style of prose, Lewis had an uncanny way of explaining complex theological systems so that his readers gained amazing new clarity in relation to the Christian faith.  Perhaps his most compelling work, Mere Christianity, was first broadcasted on the radio during WWII in England, and then compiled into a book in 1952.  Here are some excerpts from this life changing work.  God bless. – Pastor Shaw

“This is the terrible fix we are in. If the universe is not governed by an absolute goodness, then all our efforts are in the long run hopeless. But if it is, then we are making ourselves enemies to that goodness every day, and are not in the least likely to do any better tomorrow, and so our case is hopeless again….God is the only comfort, He is also the supreme terror: the thing we most need and the thing we most want to hide from.”

“Christians] believe that the living, dynamic activity of love has been going on in God forever and has created everything else. And that, by the way, is perhaps the most important difference between Christianity and all other religions: that in Christianity God is not an impersonal thing nor a static thing – not even just one person – but a dynamic pulsating activity, a life, a kind of drama, almost, if you will not think me irreverent, a kind of dance … (The) pattern of this three-personal life is … the great fountain of energy and beauty spurting up at the very center of reality.”

“Among these Jews there suddenly turns up a man who goes about talking as if He was God. He claims to forgive sins. He says He has always existed. He says He is coming to judge the world at the end of time. Now let us get this clear. Among Pantheists, like the Indians, anyone might say that he was a part of God, or one with God: there would be nothing very odd about it. But this man, since He was a Jew, could not mean that kind of God. God, in their language, meant the Being outside of the world, who had made it and was infinitely different from anything else. And when you have grasped that, you will see that what this man said was, quite simply, the most shocking thing that has ever been uttered by human lips.”

“I am trying here to prevent anyone saying the really foolish thing that people often say about Him: ‘I’m ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don’t accept His claim to be God.’ That is the one thing we must not say. A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would be either a lunatic — on a level with the man who says he is a poached egg — or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse. You can shut Him up for a fool, you can spit at Him and kill Him as a demon; or you can fall at His feet and call Him Lord and God. But let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about His being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.”

 

 

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